April update: New chicks, new seedlings, and winter moth patrol

It’s hard to believe that it’s almost late April, and yet things are just starting to warm up!

The ground is still too wet and cold to do any planting, but there are still plenty of catch-up things to do. Here’s a look at what’s going on at Farmer John’s.

Seedlings

Last year I raised and sold about 300 seedlings. I ran out of many varieties. so this year I’m hoping to have about twice as many available on my farmstand at 8 Kendricks Court, Amesbury. Like all things at Farmer John’s, my seedlings will be cheap — $3 per 6-pack; $2 per individual plant.  I expect to start selling them around mid May.

They are coming along great. I’m a huge tomato fanatic, so I pour much of my energy into finding and growing the most interesting and tastiest varieties. Here’s a look at the varieties of tomatoes that I’ll have:

 

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Brad’s Atomic tomatoes

Sun gold, Brad’s Atomic, yellow brandywine, pink brandywine, Campari, pink tiger, Chadwick cherry, German lunchbox,  Amish paste.

I may have a couple other tomato varieties available — we’ll see how they do.

Also, I’ll have some squashes, a variety of herbs, broccoli, cabbage, eggplant, and perhaps some flower seedlings for sale too. I’ll probably be selling raspberry roots as well. Keep an eye on my Facebook page for updates.

New chicks

With the weather finally heading into the 50s and 60s consistently, I figured now is the time to get some chicks to add to my laying hens. Last year I was able to get my chicks in mid March — that’s an indication of how much colder this spring has been compared to last.

 

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Golden comets and barred rocks searching for goodies in my brooder.

I raise them in the chicken coop, which is unheated, so I needed to wait until the outside temperature was a little more friendly to chicks’ need for very high and consistent temperatures.  With a heat lamp I can easily hit the 90 degree threshold that chicks need to survive their first week, and as the chicks begin to fledge, the needed warming temperature will also decrease (by about 5 degrees per week). So I should be all set.

I find that the best local choice for chicks is Dodge’s Agway, which has stores in Exeter, Hampton Falls, and Plaistow, N.H. I’ve bought chicks from Dodge’s several times and found them to be healthy, vigorous, and — most importantly — all properly sexed. And by that I mean they are all hens. I’ve bought from other sources in the past and found some young roosters included in the mix. Roosters, as you may know, are a major headache. They’re also “illegal” in my town.

Dodge’s also has a broad mix of breeds, all in line with the backyard farmer’s practical needs. I’ve been known in the past to buy some of the oddball breeds — like Polish crested hens — and invariably the novelty of these breeds disappears quickly when you realize how few eggs you get from them. Dodge’s stocks the proven egg producers, like barred rocks, Rhode Island reds, wyandottes, golden comets, auracaunas, and buff Orpingtons.

Winter moths

Winter moths have become the scourge of my blueberry bushes and fruit trees (although they don’t seem to like peach trees)… I had a devastating influx of them 3 years ago, but as time as gone on I’ve managed to put a big dent in their population. My primary weapon is the chickens — I let them free-range under the blueberries and around the trees. They eat the winter moth larvae as they descend from the branches by the thousands. But they can’t get to the larvae that hatch in the branches and are eating the buds, so to get those larvae I need to spray.

 

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Winter moth larvae

Now that the buds on the trees and the blueberries are about to open, the winter moth larvae are sure to hatch and start their voracious habit of destroying blossoms.  So in order to get them as they hatch, I spray the blueberries with Bt Monterey, an organic compound that is devastatingly effective on moth larvae.  I made the first application yesterday, and will repeat it every 3 days or so.

 

A friend swears by Neem oil as a more effective way to deal with winter moths. I’ve never tried it, but I might use it later in the season if I start seeing significant damage.

That’s the quick update for this week. By next week I hope to start planting.

John Macone owns farmer John’s Organic Foods, a neighborhood farmstand in Amesbury, Mass. If you want to get updates on what’s happening at the farmstand, like the Farmer John’s Facebook page.

5 ways to get through the wintry spring blues

Technically it’s been spring for almost 3 weeks, but I guess Mother Nature prefers to replay winter’s Top 10 hits.

Boy, it stinks. Too cold to do much of anything outside. And yesterday, as if the biting and raw cold wasn’t enough, we got a coating of snow. And next week they say we are in for another Nor’Easter, our 18th in 3 weeks. Or something like that.

I know, we’ve all had enough. Check out the “scenic” photo at the top of this blog.  Says it all. Bleak. People are ready to get outside and start the spring planting process. But it’s a futile prospect for at least another week, maybe longer.

So what’s a bored outdoorsperson to do?  Well, in order to cheer myself up, and hopefully anyone else who reads this blog, I came up with a list of 5 things that may put a little spring in your step.

1 — Go to a spring-themed event

This is the time of year when chambers of commerce and horticultural societies hold their spring marketing events.   In my town, there’s a local home and garden show, which I plan to check out. There’s a bunch of different events going on this weekend around Boston. Here’s one that looks interesting, though a bit pricey.

2 — Watch some YouTube videos

YouTube is a fantastic resource for learning about new techniques for gardening. There are thousands of videos that will inspire you. Pick something you’d like to get to know better, say no-till gardening, and check out the uploaded videos. Here’s one channel that I’ve been watching.

3 — Find a new plant to plant

You may have already bought all your seeds, but maybe there’s a new plant out there that you’d like to try. Take a nice warm bath or shower, get warmed up and lulled into a springtime mode, and think about the stuff that you’ve wanted to grow but haven’t. Then, get on your computer and start finding your new plant for 2018. Here’s what I picked. (I skipped the shower).

4 — Find a new website to visit

Do a little web surfing, and you are bound to find a new site that has a bunch of stuff that you’d love to buy, or maybe a lot of information that’s useful for research. Here’s a site I found for my “find a new plant” project.

5 — Find a new tool to buy

There’s always some new (or old) gadget that’s worth checking out, some labor-saving device that might make your toil a little less toilish. Here’s a selfless self promotion — a column I did last year on 3 tools to check out. And of course there are tons of other tools to check out. YouTube is again a good place to look. Here’s a typical video on a great tool.

Well hopefully those five things will keep you occupied until the temperature hits 50. Think spring!

John Macone owns farmer John’s Organic Foods, a neighborhood farmstand in Amesbury, Mass. If you want to get updates on what’s happening at the farmstand, like the Farmer John’s Facebook page.

 

March update: A no-till experiment

I’m an old dog when it comes to gardening and farming. But this year I’m going to try to learn a new trick.

Saturday’s fine weather (low 50s and sunny) was perfect for the first task of getting the crop field ready. Normally that first task would be rototilling and maybe laying down a smattering of lime, but this year the tiller will for the most part stay in the barn. I decided to try “no-till” farming to see if it is as effective as its fans say it is.

I have one main reason for being drawn to no-till. My growing field is on a moderate slope, dropping about 6-8 feet over a 65-foot width. It’s also located about 1/3rd of the way down a long sloping hill, and that means it is subject to a lot of water flow and erosion. Usually after I rototill, it seems that there’s a hefty rainstorm that causes dozens of rivulets to run through the field, pulling down the freshly turned earth with it. Occasionally the runoff ends up depositing in a wooded glade below the field. It looks like a mess. Not good!

Benefits of no-till

No-till gardening is ideally suited to prevent erosion from happening. It also has three other benefits of note.

  • It doesn’t suffer the compaction problems that tilling causes. Rototilling may seem to aerate the soil at first, but over the course of a few weeks the soil will actually compact into a much tighter mixture than before. The air pockets that you created by tilling are quickly eliminated because the soil has lost its natural structure. This makes it much harder for plants to thrive.
  • The billions of microscopic critters that live in your soil don’t have their world turned upside down. In effect you’ve killed the complicated world that micro organisms have worked all year to build. All of the benefits that the micro environment provides for your plants and for a healthy soil must be rebuilt from scratch every time you rototill. The experts argue that by leaving that micro environment in place, you will increase the fertility of your soil.
  • Old weed seeds don’t see the light of day. The act of turning the soil exposes thousands of weed seeds to a better growing environment. The argument goes that by not turning the soil, you’ll have fewer weeds.

From a practical standpoint, there’s a couple things to consider when doing a no-till garden. The soil still needs to be aerated, and that means some hefty work on your part. First you need to rake off all the “garden garbage” that was left on top of the soil last year. And you’ll need to cart it away — or maybe not. I was thinking I’ll leave it on the garden paths to act as a mulch/soil saver.

Next, you’ll need a pitchfork to loosen the soil in order to get some air down there. This I think is the hardest part, especially if you have some substantial real estate to garden in. You’ve got to push that pitchfork down as far as it will go, then pull back on the handle about a foot for so. Pull back just enough to loosen the soil, but don’t pull hard enough to pull up that clump of soil you’ve latched onto. You want it to stay pretty much intact so that the micro organisms don’t have their world turns asunder.

Stage 1 completed

So on Saturday, instead of rototilling (actually the ground was too wet to till), I got my measuring tape out and laid out my garden bed grids. Last year I expanded the garden significantly, and so I’m able to fit 20 125-square foot beds (each is about 5 feet wide by 21 feet long), plus 4 120-square-foor beds (each is 3 feet wide and about 40 feet long), plus a half dozen other odd-sizes beds. I also laid out a cross-shaped grid of 3-foor wide paths, connected by a grid of smaller 2-foot wide paths. that’s a lot of math and yes i screwed it up a bit and had to re-lay some of the lines. But in the end it all looks pretty neat and tidy.

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My early season beds after being raked. The beds are pretty long, about 3 feet by 41 feet, and they follow the slope of the hill. In past years I’ve had some serious erosion along these beds, so I’m hoping that no-till techniques will minimize that.

 

Next, I started the no-till process — I gently raked off the top detritus in some of the beds where I plan to plant my earliest crops. I didn’t have the hootspa to start the task of pitchforking/aerating each of the beds.  I’ll save that for tomorrow.

As you can see from my cover photo, I uncovered last year’s catnip, which caused my buddy Big Mac to have a very pleasant afternoon. In the photo he’s staggering off from a nice rendezvous with the catnip plant. Also, i spotted the first crops that are springing up — rhubarb. The asparagus won’t be too far behind.

Are you interested in a no-till garden? Let me know at my email address, maconer@Comcast.net. I’d love to hear your thoughts!

John Macone owns and operates Farmer John’s Organic Foods, a neighborhood organic farm in Amesbury, Massachusetts that offers organic vegetables, berries and eggs at very affordable prices. For updates, like his Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/Farmerjohnsfoods/

 

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Rhubarb starting to spring from the ground